Hardware

Load Testing Your Storage Subsystem with Diskspd – Part III

In our final post in our “Load Testing Your Storage Subsystem with Diskspd” series, we’re going to look at output from Diskspd and run some tests and interpret results. In our [first post][1] we showed how performance can vary based on access pattern and IO size. In our [second post][2] we showed how to design a test to highlight those performance characteristics and in this post we’ll execute those tests and review the results.

Load Testing Your Storage Subsystem with Diskspd

One of the primary activities I do before bringing SQL Server into production is load testing the storage subsystem. On a new system this is critical because I want to ensure that we’re “getting what we’ve paid for” when it comes to the disk subsystem. All too often there’s a configuration issue, component mismatch, a fundamental misunderstanding of the technology or worse an insufficient disk subsystem…these all can lead to poor disk performance.

Standard SQL Server Build

Often I’m asked what is the best practice for a single SQL Server installation. Well, that is a tricky questions and the answer is it always depends. Let’s discuss what a “standard” SQL Server build looks like if you had to start somewhere. Here let’s focus on Standard edition on a physical server. Enterprise edition and virtualization are topics that can stand on their own. Processors – The higher the clock frequency the better SQL Server is licensed by the core.