Performance

SQL Server, Persistent Memory on NVDIMMs and DAX

Paradigm Shift! What do I mean by that? Every once in a while a technology comes along and changes the way things are done, moves the bar…well last week Microsoft released a Channel 9 video on persistent memory using NVDIMMs and DAX on Windows 2016…then combining it with SQL Server! This is one of those technologies that moves the bar! Check it out here. Why is this important? Relational databases like SQL Server use a transaction log to ensure the durability of the transactional operations to the database.

CPU Scheduling Basics – Windows and SQL Server

In this post we’re going to introduce the basics of CPU scheduling. In a computer system, only one thing can happen at a time. More specifically, only one task can be on a processor at a point in time. This can expand to several tasks if the system has multiple processors or a processor with multiple cores, which most modern systems have. For example, a four core system can potentially execute four tasks concurrently.

Load Testing Your Storage Subsystem with Diskspd – Part III

In our final post in our “Load Testing Your Storage Subsystem with Diskspd” series, we’re going to look at output from Diskspd and run some tests and interpret results. In our [first post][1] we showed how performance can vary based on access pattern and IO size. In our [second post][2] we showed how to design a test to highlight those performance characteristics and in this post we’ll execute those tests and review the results.

Load Testing Your Storage Subsystem with Diskspd – Part II

In this post we’re going discuss how to implement load testing of your storage subsystem with DiskSpd. We’re going to craft tests to measure bandwidth and latency for specific access patterns and IO sizes. In the last post “Load Testing Your Storage Subsystem with Diskspd” we looked closely at access patterns and I/O size and discussed the impact each has on key performance attributes. Diskspd command options Let’s start with some common command options, don’t get caught up on the syntax.

Load Testing Your Storage Subsystem with Diskspd

One of the primary activities I do before bringing SQL Server into production is load testing the storage subsystem. On a new system this is critical because I want to ensure that we’re “getting what we’ve paid for” when it comes to the disk subsystem. All too often there’s a configuration issue, component mismatch, a fundamental misunderstanding of the technology or worse an insufficient disk subsystem…these all can lead to poor disk performance.