Containers

New Pluralsight Course – Configuring and Managing Kubernetes Storage and Scheduling

My new course “Configuring and Managing Kubernetes Storage and Scheduling” in now available on Pluralsight here! Check out the trailer here or if you want to dive right in go here! This course offers practical tips from my experiences managing Kubernetes Clusters and workloads for Centino Systems clients. This course targets IT professionals that design and maintain Kubernetes and container based solutions.The course can be used by both the IT pro learning new skills and the system administrator or developer preparing for using Kubernetes both on premises and in the Cloud and is the fourth course in my Kubernetes Administration Learning Path.

Upgrading SQL Server 2017 Containers to 2019 non-root Containers with Data Volumes – Another Method

Yesterday in this post I described a method to correct permissions when upgrading a SQL Server 2017 container using Data Volumes to 2019’s non-root container on implementations that use the Moby or HyperKit VM. My friend Steve Jones’ on Twitter wondered if you could do this in one step by attaching a shell (bash) in the 2017 container prior to shutdown. Absolutely…let’s walk through that here in this post. I opted to use an intermediate container in the prior post out of an abundance of caution so that I was not changing permissions on the SQL Server instance directory and all of the data files while they were in use.

Upgrading SQL Server 2017 Containers to 2019 non-root Containers with Data Volumes

Recently Microsoft released a Non-Root SQL Server 2019 container and that’s the default if you’re pulling a new container image. But what if you’re using a 2017 container running as root and want to upgrade your system the SQL Server 2019 container…well something’s going to break. As you can see here, my friend Grant Fritchey came across this issue recently and asked for some help on Twitter’s #sqlhelp. This article describe a solution to getting things sorted and running again.

Speaking at PASS Summit 2019!

I’m very pleased to announce that I will be speaking at PASS Summit 2019! This is my second time speaking at PASS Summit and I’m very excited to be doing so! What’s more, is I get to help blaze new ground with an emerging technology,** Kubernetes and how to run SQL Server in Kubernetes**! My session is “Inside Kubernetes – An Architectural Deep Dive” if you’re a just getting started in the container space and want to learn how Kubernetes works and dive into how to deploy SQL Server in Kubernetes this is the session for you.

Updated: Getting Started with Installing Kubernetes

Let’s get you started on your Kubernetes journey with installing Kubernetes and creating a cluster in virtual machines. Kubernetes is a distributed system, you will be creating a cluster which will have a master node that is in charge of all operations in your cluster. In this walkthrough we’ll create three workers which will run our applications. This cluster topology is, by no means, production ready. If you’re looking for production cluster builds check out Kubernetes documentation.

Memory Settings for Running SQL Server in Kubernetes

People often ask me what’s the number one thing to look out for when running SQL Server on Kubernetes…the answer is memory settings. In this post, we’re going to dig into why you need to configure resource limits in your SQL Server’s Pod Spec when running SQL Server workloads in Kubernetes. I’m running these demos in Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS), but these concepts apply to any SQL Server environment running in Kubernetes.

Using kubectl logs to read the SQL Server Error Log in Kubernetes

When working with SQL Server running containers the Error Log is written to standard out. Kubernetes will expose that information to you via kubectl. Let’s check out how it works. If we start up a Pod running SQL Server and grab the Pod name kubectl get pods NAME READY STATUS RESTARTS AGE mssql-deployment-56d8dbb7b7-hrqwj 1/1 Running 0 22m We can usefollow flag and that will continuously write the error log to your console, similar to using tail with the -f option.

New Pluralsight Course – Managing Kubernetes Controllers and Deployments

My new course “Managing Kubernetes Controllers and Deployments” in now available on Pluralsight here! Check out the trailer here or if you want to dive right in go here! This course offers practical tips from my experiences managing Kubernetes Clusters and workloads for Centino Systems clients. <div> </div> <p> This course targets IT professionals that design and maintain Kubernetes and container based solutions.The course can be used by both the IT pro learning new skills and the system administrator or developer preparing for using Kubernetes both on premises and in the Cloud.

Workshop – Kubernetes Zero to Hero at SQL Saturday Denver!

Pre-conference Workshop at SQLSaturday Denver I’m proud to announce that I will be be presenting an all day pre-conference workshop at SQL Saturday Denver on October 11th 2019! This one won’t let you down!  The workshop is **“Kubernetes Zero to Hero – Installation, Configuration, and Application Deployment” ** <p> <strong>Here’s the abstract for the workshop</strong> </p> </div> <div> <blockquote> <p> Modern application deployment needs to be fast and consistent to keep up with business objectives and Kubernetes is quickly becoming the standard for deploying container-based applications, fast.

Using strace inside a SQL Server Container

So, if you’ve been following my blog you know my love for internals. Well, I needed to find out exactly how something worked at the startup of a SQL Server process running inside a docker container and my primary tool for this is strace, well how do you run strace against processes running in a container? I hadn’t done this before and needed to figure this out…so let’s go through how I pulled this off.